HomeBiographyWritingsPhotosContactAncient Maya Settlement Patterns and Environment at Tikal, Guatemala: Implications for Subsistence Models Dennis Edward Puleston A Dissertation in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 1973

Table of Contents

Notes

Preface

Introduction

 

Objectives
The Role of Settlement Data
The Role of Environment
Toward a Definition of Settlement Patterns
Other Definitions

 

Chapter One: The Problem of Ancient Maya Demography

 

Intersite Settlement Density
Site Orientation of Mapping
The Site Orientation of Excavation
Difficulty of Survey in the Maya Lowland
Quantifying Settlement Data
Trail Surveys
Area Surveys
Site Survey
The Inconsistencies of Subsistence Data
The Sustaining Area Hypothesis

 

Chapter Two: Field Procedure of the Sustaining Area Project

 

The Limitations of Aerial Survey
The Brechas: Backbone of the Ground Survey
Mapping Techniques

 

Chapter Three: Map Preparation (not included)

 

Map Scale
Designation of Features and Organization
Symbols and Standards of Representation

 

Chapter Four: The Presentation of Mapping Data

 

The East Brecha Survey Strip
The South Brecha Survey Strip
The West Brecha Survey Strip
The North Brecha Survey Strip
The Northwest Border Brecha Survey Strip
The Uaxatun Brecha Survey Strip
The Ceramic Survey

 

Chapter Five: The Calculation of Prehistoric Demographic Patterns

 

The Assumption of Residential Contemporaneity
Arguments Against Residential Stability
Arguments for Residential Stability
Hidden House Ruins
Estimating Inhabitants per Structure

 

Chapter Six: Estimates of Ancient Populations

 

The Population of Late Classic Tikal
Discussion of the North and South Survey Strips in Terms of Cultivable Land
The Population of Early Classic Tikal
The Population of Late Preclassic Tikal
Postclassic Settlement in the Tikal Area
The Settlement of Intersite Areas
Total Structures in the Tikal National Park

 

Chapter Seven: Environmental Aspects of the Cultural Ecology of the Lowland Maya

 

Geology and Topography
Climate
Hydrography
Soils
Vegetation
Fauna

 

Chapter Eight: Subsistence Aspects of the Cultural Ecology of the Lowland Maya

 

The Invalidation of the “Sustaining Area” Concept
Alternative Subsistence Models
Irrigation

 

Chapter Nine: Summary and Conclusions

 

Tikal Settlement Patterns
Problems for Future Consideration
Final Summary

 
 
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